In Economics, Multipolarity, Trade War, Trump, USA
The Trump administration’s protectionist measures on trade are piling up — and so are the retaliatory moves from a spate of other countries. What began with small-scale U.S. tariffs on washing machines and solar panels has now broadened to include steel and aluminum from all over the world, plus hundreds of products from China. Those tariffs have prompted a tit for tat response from affected countries, which target key U.S. exports such as bourbon, motorcycles, and orange juice. And there could be more to come, with the Trump administration studying further tariffs on imported cars and threatening much more action against China.The Trump administration’s protectionist measures on trade are piling up — and so are the retaliatory moves from a spate of other countries. What began with small-scale U.S. tariffs on washing machines and solar panels has now broadened to include steel and aluminum from all over the world, plus hundreds of products from China. Those tariffs have prompted a tit for tat response from affected countries, which target key U.S. exports such as bourbon, motorcycles, and orange juice. And there could be more to come, with the Trump administration studying further tariffs on imported cars and threatening much more action against China.

By Amy Cheng, Humza Jilani, Keith Johnson, Amy Mackinnon,  Jun 21, 2018

Originally published on Foreign Policy


Here’s how the U.S. tariffs and international reprisals stand

U.S. Tariffs

Country AffectedGoods affectedTariff %Value of Affected ExportsThreatened or Implemented
All countries (South Korea, Argentina, Australia, and Brazil exempt due to voluntary export limits)Steel25 percent$30 billion (U.S. 2017 imports)Implemented
All countries (South Korea, Argentina, Australia, and Brazil exempt due to voluntary export limits)Aluminum10 percent$17 billion (U.S. 2017 imports)Implemented
All CountriesWashing machines and solar panels20 to 30 percent$10.3 billion (combined)Implemented
All CountriesCars and auto parts25 percent is being discussed$208 billion (cars only)Under consideration
China818 different goods, broadly those that include “industrially significant technologies”25 percent$50 billion total (to be implemented in increments)First round of tariffs on $34 billion will come into force July 6, implementation of remaining $16 billion will then be subject to review
ChinaUnder discussion10 percent (for now, may be subject to change)$200 billionThreatened on June 18

International Retaliation

Country AffectedGoods AffectedTariffValue of Affected ExportsImplemented or Threatened
China659 U.S. products such as pork, soybeans, seafood, automobiles, and chemicals25 percentA total of $50 billion: $34 billion will go into effect on July 6; the remaining $16 billion is under reviewWill be partially implemented on July 6
CanadaIndustrial metal such as steel and aluminum, as well as consumer products such as maple syrup, pizza, and toilet paper25 percent or 10 percent depending on the item$12.5 billionWill be implemented on July 1
MexicoU.S. products such as steel goods, cheese, cranberries, bourbon, and pork25 percent or 20 percent depending on the item$3 billionImplemented
European UnionU.S. exports such as peanut butter, bourbon, orange juice, steel, and agricultural products10 percent, 25 percent, 35 percent, or 50 percent depending on the item$3.4 billionWill be implemented in July
Turkey22 U.S. items including coal, paper, walnuts, almonds, tobacco, whiskey, automobiles, cosmetics, machinery, and petrochemical products40 percent maximum$1.8 billionImplemented
JapanTo be announced, as Japan is still weighing its options and has not released any concrete information about its retaliatory tariffsTBA$409 millionThreatened
India29 items including lentils, almonds, walnuts, shrimp, apples, and some chemical and metal products10 to 50 percent depending on the item$240 million*Implemented
RussiaPotentially targeting road construction equipment, among other productsTBATBAThreatened

*This number represents the projected value of the tariffs to India. The value of the goods affected by the tariffs could not be determined.

Amy Cheng is an editorial intern at Foreign Policy. (@Amy_23_Cheng)

Humza Jilani is an editorial intern at Foreign Policy. (@humza_jilani)

Keith Johnson is Foreign Policy’s global geoeconomics correspondent. (@KFJ_FP)

Amy Mackinnon is an editorial intern at Foreign Policy. (@ak_mack)

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