In Multipolarity

Commentary by Dr. Jill Stein, published in The Guardian, Sept 13, 2016

Dr. Jill Stein (photo by Gage Skidmore)

Dr. Jill Stein (photo by Gage Skidmore)

On 6 June 2013, the Guardian broke the news that the National Security Agency (NSA) had ordered Verizon to provide it with the phone records of its customers. As the story developed, it became clear that the two other major U.S. telephone networks as well as credit card companies were doing the same thing; and that the NSA and FBI were being provided with access to server systems operated by Google, Apple, Facebook, Yahoo, Microsoft and Skype.

On 11 June the Guardian reported the source as Edward Snowden, a 29-year-old who had been working at the NSA for four years.

Snowden believed it was important for him to publicly acknowledge his role in order to provide a human face to the story. He knew he was putting his life at risk and exposing himself to decades of incarceration. “My sole motive is to inform the public as to that which is done in their name and that which is done against them,” he explained. Snowden hoped to trigger a debate “about the kind of world we want to live in”. The US government began an immediate campaign to track, harass and silence him.

More revelations followed that exposed a massive national security complex that spies on virtually everyone, everywhere. The Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISA), which is a secret court that was supposed to protect our privacy rights, was rubber-stamping every NSA request for the authority to spy without any real oversight. The U.S. government was spying on foreign leaders, working with British spies to collect massive amounts of global data across the planet and collecting over 200 million text messages daily. And the NSA was working to stop encryption (a technology developed to protect the privacy of both private individuals and businesses).

NSA director James Clapper was forced to acknowledge that he had given false testimony to Congress about NSA spying on Americans, and that Snowden’s leaks had created a healthy public debate about the balance between privacy and national security. “It’s clear that some of the conversations this has generated, some of the debate, actually needed to happen,” he said. Even Barack Obama admitted that the revelations required the US to re-think how we uphold “the civil liberties and privacy protections that our ideals – and our Constitution – require”.

Federal judges ruled that such massive collection of citizens’ metadata without any connection to a particular investigation was patently illegal, essentially vindicating Snowden. His goal was to tell the truth about the government spying on all of us, and to create public and judicial pressure on the government to create real changes in the way things are done and to stop the trajectory towards a surveillance state.

Snowden’s whistleblowing was among the most important in U.S. history. It showed us that the relationship between the people of the United States and the government has gone off track and needs a major course correction.

The Fourth Amendment of the Constitution provides that a court must find probable cause that an individual has committed a crime before issuing a warrant, and forbids systematic spying on the American people. The requirement of individualized suspicion should prohibit this type of dragnet surveillance. Spying on whole populations is not necessary, and is actually counterproductive.

If elected president, I will immediately pardon Edward Snowden, Chelsea Manning and John Kiriakou for their important work in exposing the massive, systematic violation of our constitutional rights. I would invite them to the White House to publicly acknowledge their heroism, and create a role for them in the Stein-Baraka Green Party administration to help us create a modern framework that protects personal privacy while still conducting effective investigations where warranted.

The American people have a right to privacy. My hope is that Obama uses his power to pardon Snowden now. The debate Edward Snowden began must be continued so we find a resolution that protects the freedom of press, association, religion and speech as well as the privacy of people in the United States and around the world.

Dr. Jill Stein is the candidate of the Green Party in the 2016 U.S. presidential election.

Related reading:
In Guardian interview, Edward Snowden appeals for pardon, right to return home to U.S., Sept 13, 2016

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